Senior Tech Group

Getting Comfortable With The Basics

LastPass Authenticator Makes Two-Factor Easy

LastPass Authenticator Makes Two-Factor Easy By Amber Gott, blog.lastpass.com

Exciting news! Today we’re introducing LastPass Authenticator, a free two-factor authentication app for your LastPass account and other supported services. LastPass Authenticator offers simple, secure two-factor authentication by generating 6-digit, time-based passcodes or sending you a push notification for one-tap login to LastPass. With a user-friendly experience, simple set-up, and convenient push notifications, LastPass Authenticator is an ideal option for you to boost your security.

Can You Trust Your Browser With Credit Card Information?

Can You Trust Your Browser With Credit Card Information? By Dan Price, www.makeuseof.com

You’re shopping online; you find the perfect item, proceed to checkout, and pay. Your browser remembers your username. It might even remember your password, based on what you’ve entered in the past.

But then it asks whether you want it to save your credit card information. Can you trust your browser with keeping that secure? 

Windows 10’s October 2018 Update

What’s New in Windows 10’s October 2018 Update By Chris Hoffman, www.howtogeek.com

Windows 10’s October 2018 Update, also known as version 1809 and codenamed Redstone 5 during its development process, arrived on October 2, 2018. This major upgrade includes a clipboard history that syncs between your devices and a long-awaited dark theme for File Explorer. It was initially set to bring tabs to all your applications, but that feature didn’t make the cut.

Freezing Credit Is Now Free.

Freezing Credit Is Now Free. Here’s Why You Should Do it Now.

Turning on a credit freeze is now more straightforward and more friendly to activate and temporally lift than ever. Placing a security freeze on your account makes it difficult for criminals to use stolen data to open fraudulent accounts, or borrow money, in your name.

Credit bureaus gather and hold records of your accounts and payment history that credit card companies and lending institutions use to decide whether you'll pay your bills. If your credit file is frozen, the bureaus won't provide information to lenders unless you “thaw” the freeze first, using a (PIN) personal identification number.

Under the current federal law, credit freezes are now free nationally for everyone. The three primary credit reporting bureaus, Equifax and TransUnion, and Experian now provide free credit freeze and un-freeze service. For credit freezes work effectively freeze must be placed at all three bureaus.

Free security freezes have been made available more than a year after the massive data breach at Equifax. It compromised the personal information, including Social Security numbers, birth dates, and other personal details, of over 145 million people, almost half of the United States population. Even with the scale of that breach, and many other incidents, security freezes have not caught on. An AARP survey found that less than 1 in 6 people had frozen their credit files.

Consumers realized that the breach created risk, but didn't think anything would happen to them, people tend to underestimate their own risk. 

The credit freeze process is not as easy as it could be, consumers are required to place freezes at the three bureaus separately, and keep track of three PINs. It’s not possible to know what credit bureau a lender might use; consumers usually must lift the freezes at all three bureaus when applying for new credit.

The three credit bureaus now provide smartphone apps, that consumers can use to freeze and thaw their credit more easily. They are available for both Apple and Android phones (At this time I can only recommend the TransUnion apps, the other two bureaus apps try to upsell to paid products). Consumers need to be careful when using the website and apps; they may be used to market other, fee-based products and services. You do not have to pay credit freezes are now entirely free.

Credit bureaus also offer s service called a credit “lock,” they promote as a more convenient way to protect your data. However, some of these offerings carry fees. Most consumer advocates favor freezes because the rules are set by law, rather than by the credit bureaus themselves.

It's also recommended freezing your file at a less well-known reporting agency the National Consumer Telecom and Utilities Exchange (NCTUE). They provide credit information to some cellphone, pay television and utility companies. (Consumers have had cellphone accounts opened in their names, even with freezes on their credit reports at the main bureaus.) There is no cost for an NCTUE freeze.

The law allows parents to create and freeze credit files for their children under 16, to prevent their identities from being used fraudulently. Information on how to protect your children's accounts is offered by the Federal Trade Commission.

Freezes will not protect you from all types of fraud, like a criminal using existing credit card numbers, or pretending as you online to claim your Social Security benefits. To help prevent those types of theft, check your credit card statements regularly for questionable charges You should set up and monitor an online Social Security account, to prevent criminals from opening one first and diverting your benefit checks. 

You should check your credit report periodically. Each of the three credit bureaus must provide one free report a year at annualcreditreport.com. (Having a security freeze will not prevent you from getting your free annual report the FTC tells you how.) I suggest getting a report from one of the three bureaus every 4 months, on a rotating basis. These reports will help you to keep an eye on your credit reports for free by only accessing each bureau one time a year.

Identity thieves can intercept new credit and insurances offers sent through US Postal mail to get your ID information. You can opt out of receiving offers these offers for 5 years online or permanently if you use the mail-in form. 

Visit optoutprescreen.com you can choose to opt out for 5 years online or download a mail-in form to be permanently removed from the pre-approved credit and insurance offers.

Visit these websites to set up security freezes:

In addition to the big three bureaus, you might also consider freezing access at the two smaller ones. 


Identity theft resources at the FTC website

Protecting Your Identity

  • Credit Freeze FAQs – If you’re concerned about identity theft, data breaches, or someone gaining access to your credit report without your permission, you might consider placing a credit freeze on your report.
  • Financial Readiness in Times of Disaster – You’ve got batteries, a tank of gas, and water. Are your financial papers and personal documents stored safely in case of an emergency?
  • How to Keep Your Personal Information Secure – Safeguard your personal information, whether it is on paper, online, or on your computers and mobile devices.
  • Identity Theft Protection Services – Describes identity theft protection services you can buy and free and low-cost alternatives you can use to guard against identity theft and recover if identity theft occurs.

Discovering Identity Theft

  • Identity Theft – Here's an overview of what to know and do about identity theft.
  • Warning Signs of Identity Theft – Warning signs include credit or debit charges you don’t recognize, bills for accounts you didn’t open, and IRS notices that say you filed multiple tax returns.

Identity Theft: Specific Issues


Customize Chrome’s New Tab Page

Customize Chrome’s New Tab Page, No Extensions Required By Justin Pot, www.howtogeek.com

Do you use an extension to customize Chrome’s new tab page? That’s not necessary anymore: you can now customize the default new tab page.


Here’s What’s New in Google Chrome 69 by howtogeek.com

Chrome 69, which marks the browser’s 10-year anniversary, is a huge release. The slick new theme is the most visible change, but there are more new features. For example, you can now personalize Chrome’s New Tab page with background images and custom shortcuts.

Google Chrome Help

Google Chrome Help by support.google.com

How can we help you?


Remove unwanted ads, pop-ups & malware by support.google.com

If you're seeing some of these problems with Chrome, you might have unwanted software or malware installed on your computer:

  • Pop-up ads and new tabs that won't go away
  • Your Chrome homepage or search engine keeps changing without your permission
  • Unwanted Chrome extensions or toolbars keep coming back
  • Your browsing is hijacked, and redirects to unfamiliar pages or ads
  • Alerts about a virus or an infected device

In the future, avoid unwanted software by only downloading files or visiting sites that you know are secure.

– Google Doesn’t Just Let Apps Read Your Email

No, Google Doesn’t Just Let Apps Read Your Email by howtogeek.com

There’s a story spreading in the news today that Google is letting companies scan through your email and sell the data, but this is really misleading. So what’s actually going on?

The way the story is framed makes it sound like something very nefarious is being allowed. Google is letting companies scan my Gmail account?


Opinion: Why does no one get how email apps and Gmail add-ons work? By Corbin Davenport, www.androidpolice.com

There are legitimate security concerns about Google, most recently around its handling of user location data. However, there are a growing number of media outlets and U.S government officials bashing the company for allowing Gmail add-ons and third-party mail clients to read user messages – which is required for them to function.

Chromebook vs Laptop

Chromebook vs Laptop by tech.co

If you’re working to a tighter budget for your next laptop – say, under $400 – then it’s a decision between an entry-level Windows laptop or a Chromebook.

The key thing to know about Chromebooks is that they aren’t as versatile as a Windows laptop

Are Your Password Security Habits Improving

Are Your Password Security Habits Improving? (Infographic) by entrepreneur.com

From the French presidential election to Gmail, a number of incidents have unfolded this year revealing how vulnerable our online security is. That’s why it’s more important than ever to make sure you go above and beyond to secure your digital privacy. And that can be as simple as changing your password every once in awhile.

– 5 best password managers for Android

The 5 best password managers for Android by androidpolice.com

Our accounts hold invaluable information about us — about our work, our finances, and our social lives. Keeping that information safe from prying eyes is paramount, and to do that, we need solid passwords. Assuming you're a typical person living in the modern age, you probably have accounts and passwords for about a million websites and services, and it can be hard to keep them all straight. Password managers take the onus of remembering dozens and dozens of (hopefully) unique strings of characters off our stupid brains, and once you've used one, it's hard to imagine going without. 

Credit freeze: A freebie that you actually want

Credit freeze: A misunderstood freebie that you actually want by freep.com

On Sept. 21, the three big credit reporting agencies will have to give consumers credit freezes for free.

Just one year ago, consumers woke up and discovered that hackers had one heck of a field day with their Social Security numbers and other information in a massive data breach at Equifax. 


Credit Freezes Will Soon Be Free by lifehacker.com

With the one-year anniversary of the Equifax breach just behind us, here’s a reminder that you will be able to freeze your credit reports and sign up for year-long fraud alerts for free starting Sept. 21 thanks to a federal law passed earlier this year. 


Know the difference between a fraud alert and a credit freeze by komonews.com

It's been one year since Equifax let us know that hackers stole the personal information of half the adults in the country. But a surveyshows most of us have not taken steps to freeze our credit reports.

– Office 365 Home Update

Office 365 Home Update – Now with more users, and sign-ins.

Starting October 2, 2018 subscribers to Microsoft Office 365 Home accounts will allow more users to access the subscription and increase login limits.

Microsoft Office 365 Home at $99/year gives access to Office applications such as Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and 1 TB of OneDrive storage for each user. Office 365 Home was limited to 5 users with 10 device installs total, five of the devices could be PCs, and the rest could be tablets or phones. With the new terms, Office 365 Home is now going to cover six people instead of five, and each allowed 1 TB of OneDrive storage.  Device limit has increased as well, with no limits to the number of devices Office is installed on, and each user can be signed into Office on five devices at a time. 

These new changes come at no additional cost. Office 365 Home still costs $99/year, or $9.99 per month directly from Microsoft. You can save more by buying the Microsoft Office 365 Home 1 year Product Key Card from Amazon or Costco, they both offer it for about $85.

Grandparents this is a great gift for your grandchildren.
You can have a copy of Office 365 and five remaining subscriptions to give to your grandkids or anyone you choose. Microsoft Office is the standard in business, being familiar with these tools is essential for young people entering the workforce.


Why Microsoft’s Office 365 is a Great Deal by howtogeek.com

Microsoft’s Office 365 service has been a great deal for a long time, and it’s getting better. Starting, soon Office 365 Home will let six users install an unlimited number of Office applications.

 

Google Titan Security Key review

Google Titan Security Key review: A $50 hardware 2FA bundle with outdated connectors by androidpolice.com

Those of us that care about our online security probably use some form of two-factor authentication to secure our most important accounts, but even the strongest password and the longest authentication code are still subject to something as simple as a phishing attack, which is why so many have switched to hardware security keys. Google helped to create the Universal 2nd Factor (U2F) hardware authentication standard, and now it's releasing its own product to consumers: the $50 Titan Security Key.


How to Set Up and Use the Google Titan Key Bundle by howtogeek.com

Google recently released a set of two-factor authentication (2FA) security keys called the Titan Security Bundle. This set includes a traditional USB-based Universal Second Factor (U2F) key for use on a computer and a combination Bluetooth/USB key for mobile. Here’s how to get it all set up.

Why I Can’t Quit Chrome

Why I Can't Quit Chrome by gizmodo.com

Google Chrome was released to the world 10 years ago today. I’ve been using the browser since it launched on OS X in 2009, and let me tell you what, I feel trapped now. This power-hogging, data-gobbling piece of software is where I spend most of my days, although not necessarily because I want it this way. As hard as I’ve tried, I just can’t quit Chrome.

How Two Friends Built a Remote Astrophotography Observatory

How Two Friends Built a Remote Astrophotography Observatory by petapixel.com

Deep Sky West is a remote astrophotography observatory in New Mexico, USA. It offers the opportunity for any astrophotographer around the world to use the site to access clear skies without the need to travel there, and to use advanced astronomy and photography equipment without the need to own it themselves.  DeepSkyWest

Two-Step Authentication on Your Microsoft Account

How to Set Up Two-Step Authentication on Your Microsoft Account by lifehacker.com

If we’ve said it once, we’ve said it a million times: You should use two-factor authentication everywhere you can. It’s an easily enacted security measure that should give you a lot more peace of mind. 

Technically, Microsoft protects its apps with “two-step verification” rather than two-factor verification. 

Google’s hardware 2FA Titan Security Keys

Google's hardware 2FA Titan Security Keys available starting today for $50 at the Google Store by androidpolice.com

If you're conscious of your own digital security in the modern era, then odds are you use two/multi-factor authentication to secure your more important accounts, but not all methods are equal. If you're especially concerned — or especially "high value" in security terms — hardware-based keys are the better choice, as they offer additional protections against things like phishing attacks. And starting today, those invested heavily into Google's ecosystem can pick up the previously announcedTitan Security Keys over on the Google Store.


What it's like to live under the Google Advanced Protection Program by androidcentral.com

I am not what I'd call a Very Important Person. I still consider myself a journalist of sorts (and it's what's on my college degree), but I wouldn't say I practice it in the way I did back when I made newspapers. I also am neither an activist, business leader, or am on a political campaign team.

Am I really a candidate for Google's Advanced Protection Program? Do I really need the strongest account security Google offers publicly?

Why Your Router Has Two Wifi Bands and How They Work

Why Your Router Has Two Wifi Bands and How They Work by gizmodo.com

Few devices are as essential to the smooth running of a modern-day digital household than a wireless router, so it’s strange that this black box is so little understood. Here we’ll outline one of the key features of many modern routers, dual band 2.4GHz and 5GHz support, so you know exactly what it is and how to take advantage of each.

Things you didn’t know Google Docs could do

25 incredibly useful things you didn’t know Google Docs could do by fastcompany.com

When you’re working in a word processor, every second you save matters. And while Google Docs may seem simple on the surface, it’s practically overflowing with out-of-sight options that can help you get more done with less effort.

The best part? They’re all already there and just waiting to be embraced. All you have to do is find them—and then remember to put them to use. Here’s a head start.

How to Juggle Multiple Google Calendars

How to Juggle Multiple Google Calendars by howtogeek.com

If you only have one Google account, managing your calendar is pretty simple. But once you bring your work account, shared family calendars, and even specialty calendars into the mix, keeping things organized becomes more challenging.


How to Set Up Google Family to Share Your Google Services by howtogeek.com

If you pay for a book on Google Play Books, your significant other should be able to read it, too. The same goes for movies, music, and even apps or games—if you make a purchase, everyone in the family should be able to enjoy it. Thanks to Google Family, they can.

Google Datally adds new modes

Google Datally adds emergency bank and bedtime mode by androidandme.com

Mobile data limits are tricky creatures. Plans vary wildly in how they handle data limits and it can be confusing for users. It’s particularly bothersome when you hit your data limit and are left stranded with no or slow data. To help users, Google released Datally, an app that helps you better manage and conserve your data. Today, Datally is gaining two new features: emergency bank and bedtime mode.

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